With the mountain set to open on November 22nd, the winter season will soon be upon us once again! But with hot chocolates, advent calendars, skiing and eventually Christmas, the winter season poses a lot of potential dangers for our teeth. At Whistler Dental, we are proud to offer a wide variety of cosmetic dentistry procedures. From teeth whitening, to smile makeovers, to custom mouth guards, here’s how to get your mouth ready for winter and get your best holiday smile yet.

Schedule a cleaning

The first step to brightening your smile is to schedule an appointment with your dentist. We will make sure your pearly whites are polished and cleaned professionally, and will remove any plaque, tartar and surface stains that may have built up. Regular check-ups with your dentist are essential to make sure you are brushing and flossing properly, and so your dentist can check your gums and teeth for signs of disease or cavities.

Align your smile

If you are not completely happy with your smile, this can greatly affect your confidence. Invisalign is a non-invasive, simple and subtle solution that straightens out teeth and gives you a perfect smile. These discrete, removable aligners are much more subtle than traditional braces, and almost invisible once they are in your mouth, meaning you can wear them on the slopes and at the après bars without garnering any attention. Plus – unlike with braces – they do not limit your diet or eating habits, making them the perfect tooth alignment treatment for the winter season.

Get a smile makeover

Smile makeovers are especially effective for chipped, worn or crooked teeth. From dental veneers and bridges to crowns and dental implants, Whistler Dental offers a variety of cosmetic procedures to give you the smile of your dreams.

One of the safest forms of cosmetic dentistry is teeth whitening. We offer both take-home or in-house whitening, and our professional methods will always deliver more effective results than store-bought methods.

Protect your mouth on the mountain

The delicate skin on our lips is particularly susceptible to cold weather and damage caused by UV rays. If you plan on spending a whole day on the mountain, it’s important to keep your lips protected with a moisturizing SPF lip balm to avoid the dreaded pain of dry, cracked, or even burnt lips.

Before you return to the slopes, it’s also worth getting fitted with a custom mouth guard. Mouth guards protect teeth from damage due to injuries and falls, and are worn by all elite winter athletes. Although Whistler Blackcomb does not make them compulsory, they highly recommend that you wear them.

 Keep your oral hygiene routine

The best thing you can do for a healthy smile is stick to your teeth cleaning routine – all year round. Don’t let holiday parties or long days on the mountain get in the way of oral hygiene. To maintain your smile, make sure you brush and floss daily, and keep an eye out for any changes to your mouth.

While we hope (and highly recommend!) that you make the most of the start of winter by getting stuck in with all things winter-sports related, we also highly recommend that you take the time to protect your teeth and mouth. To achieve your dream holiday smile, book your appointment with Whistler Dental today.

“Are you flossing regularly?” is probably a question you get asked every single time you visit the dentist. And that’s because it’s important! Many people hate the feeling of moving a piece of floss between their teeth, and therefore leave flossing out of their daily teeth cleaning routine. But just brushing your teeth often isn’t enough to remove plaque and prevent cavities. Helping you maintain a healthy smile by protecting your teeth and gums and protecting you from other diseases, here’s why flossing needs to be a part of your daily routine.

Why isn’t brushing enough?

The tooth has 5 surfaces, but your toothbrush can only reach 3 of them. The two untouched surfaces are very close to the sides of other teeth, making it easy for food to get trapped in between. When food gets stuck in these gaps, it creates a breeding ground for bacteria to build up, creating plaque. This is where floss comes in handy – as an interdental cleaning tool, it can get into these tight spaces and remove 80% of plaque.

Protect your gums

When you neglect flossing, plaque and bacteria can easily build up. If they are not removed properly the bacteria will eventually begin to irritate gum tissue, and this will get worse as bacteria increases. When left untreated, this can eventually cause Gingivitis – a periodontal disease that causes red and puffy gums to bleed easily.

And your teeth

As well as causing irritation, the bacteria between your teeth will also destroy your tooth’s enamel, causing a cavity. Flossing will remove this plaque to prevent the build-up of harmful bacteria. Regularly flossing is a great way to check your mouth for potential cavities, as well as swelling or redness. It will also make your teeth look brighter by removing plaque and excess food that you may not spot in a mirror.

Protects from other diseases

If left untreated, bacteria in an unhealthy mouth can harm the rest of your body. Gingivitis can enter the bloodstream and travel to other parts of the body, leading to heart disease, diabetes and respiratory illnesses. Flossing only takes a couple of minutes out of your day, but will have huge benefits on your long-term health.

Good for your overall health

We understand that brushing your teeth after each meal may not be convenient, but flossing after a meal is easy and can be done anywhere. Not only does regular flossing help you practice good oral hygiene, but it can also help you maintain a healthy diet and lifestyle, as flossing after eating will make you less tempted to snack.

Dentists recommend that you should floss once a day, the best time being in the evenings after you brush to remove any food and plaque at the end of the day. If you are concerned about dental diseases or have noticed any sensitivity or changes to your teeth, please book an appointment with Whistler Dental.

Most parts of the body are formed at birth. We get one set of bones, organs, eyes and hands that all develop and age with us as we grow older. However, the same cannot be said for our teeth. Our teeth go through an interesting and dramatically different lifecycle, from the first signs of teething, to permanent teeth developing, the pain of wisdom teeth and eventually tooth decay. Here’s a brief summary of what to expect at each stage.

A tooth is born

While newborns do not have any teeth, their front teeth are already fully formed. Teeth start forming just 6 weeks after conception, when they begin to grow down into the developing jaw. These teeth start to come through when a baby reaches around 2-3 months old, and most children have a full set of 20 milk teeth by the time they are 3. As teeth develop, they take on many shades. Tooth colour has a lot to do with genetics, so don’t worry if they appear discoloured initially.

Permanent teeth develop

When kids reach around 5 or 6, their jaws are strong enough to support permanent teeth, and so baby teeth start to fall out and visits from the Tooth Fairy begin. Developing permanent teeth eventually put enough pressure on the roots of the baby teeth, which causes them to break. By the time to tooth falls out, most of the root has already been reabsorbed into the gums. Their new adult tooth could appear in as soon as a week, or as long as six months.

The pain of wisdom teeth

Though our first incisors make an appearance at around age 6, our third set of molars often don’t come in until late teens. Believed to have been necessary for our ancestors’ diet, many people today are born with a jawbone that simply doesn’t have space for another set of molars. This overcrowding can cause wisdom teeth to be impacted – or stuck – between the jawbone and the other set of molars. Some can even get stuck and get infected while erupting, meaning they need to be taken out.

The aging tooth

Like all parts of the body, as people age, our teeth age with us. Cavities in the dentin become more common, and the risk of periodontal disease also increases. While many people do eventually need to have teeth removed, if you practice proper dental care from an early age and continue to do so at every stage of your tooth’s lifecycle, your teeth may well last a lifetime!

Whistler Dental would love to give you the reliable, affordable and exceptional dental care you need to maintain a beautiful and healthy smile for life. We offer a family-friendly environment and have plenty of experience with children of all ages, so please get in contact.

Thanksgiving is a time for seeing family, giving thanks, and eating – eating well! However, while you’re preparing your family’s big feast, take some time to consider your dental health. We all like to indulge in our favourite delicious dishes once a year, but many Thanksgiving foods can hurt and damage our teeth. Here are some popular Thanksgiving dishes that you should be wary of, and others that you can fully indulge in!

Thanksgiving foods that can hurt your teeth:

 

Cranberry Sauce

As turkey’s tasty sidekick, cranberry sauce is definitely a Thanksgiving staple. However, it comes as no surprise that cranberry sauce is packed with sugars that encourage bad oral bacteria to thrive. If you do want to include cranberry sauce at your dinner table, try to make it using fresh cranberries, instead of canned.

Pies and Desserts

No Thanksgiving dinner is complete without dessert, but Maple Pecan pies, Nanaimo bars, and buttery Apple Pies can all do serious damage to your teeth. While they may taste delicious, they’re full of starch and sugars that cause bacteria to chip away at the tooth enamel.

Stuffing

From apple and walnut to sausage and herb, people like to take their stuffing seriously! But unfortunately for our teeth, most stuffing recipes revolve around starchy bread that can create cavities and decay if left on our teeth.

Alcohol and sugary drinks

There’s nothing wrong with a glass or two of your favourite drink over the Thanksgiving weekend, but you should try to consume in moderation. Too much wine, beer and sugary drinks can wreak havoc on your teeth. Not only can they lead to staining and discoloration, but drinks high in alcohol also dry the mouth and reduce your saliva production – which removes plaque and bacteria from the tooth’s surface.

Thanksgiving foods that are good for your teeth:

 

Turkey

The star of the Thanksgiving table! Turkey is perfectly fine for teeth – so gobble up! Containing no starch or sugar, protein has phosphorus in it, which mixes with calcium and vitamin D to create strong bones and teeth.

Vegetables

Veggies are healthy for your body and your teeth. Chewing them causes your mouth to produce extra saliva, which helps to get rid of harmful bacteria.

Pumpkin Pie

In comparison with other sweet treats, pumpkin pie is full of calcium and vitamin C which helps keep gums healthy. Just make sure to eat it soon after your dinner, so you will have more saliva to wash away the leftover sugary food.

Cheese boards and nuts

Good news for all you cheese lovers out there: cheese is great for your teeth! Chewing on nuts is a great way to help your mouth produce saliva, and cheese is packed with calcium and protein which lowers the pH in your mouth and neutralizes plaque acid.

Taking care of your teeth over the Thanksgiving weekend is important. Aim to brush and floss your teeth 30 minutes after you’ve eaten, and drink plenty of water to wash away food particles in the mouth. From all of us here at Whistler Dental, we wish you a happy Thanksgiving! If you do notice tooth staining or toothache after thanksgiving, please don’t hesitate to get in contact with us.

No matter what age you are, maintaining good oral care is essential for your overall health! This is why it’s important to get into a good routine of brushing, flossing, and scheduling regular dental checkups as soon as possible. Whether you’re a kid, a teen, an adult or a senior, there are certain specific dental practices you should be following – and oral health issues that you should look out for. Here are some dental tips for every stage of life, so you can maintain a beautiful, healthy smile!

Babies and Toddlers

Teething occurs between the ages of 3-9 months. According to the Canadian Dental Association, a child’s first trip to the dentist should be within six months of their first tooth appearing, and no later than their first birthday.

With young infants, it’s important to keep an eye out for potential oral health issues early on. Thumb sucking is completely natural and normal amongst young children, but make sure it doesn’t lead to problems with bite and tooth alignment. The same goes for baby bottle tooth decay, so avoid giving your child too much sugar and make sure they have adequate exposure to fluoride.

Kids and Teens

During this stage, it’s especially important that parents set a good example when it comes to oral health. Most kids start to lose baby teeth by age 6, so teach them a great dental hygiene routine to prevent cavities and tooth decay. You can easily encourage healthy smiles by having plenty of oral health-care supplies on hand, and by encouraging a healthy diet.

For image-conscious teens, teeth can be a source of deep insecurity. If your child wants straighter teeth or needs to correct their bite, schedule an appointment with your dentist to see whether Invisalign or traditional braces would be a better fit. It’s also worth noting that wisdom teeth usually come in during the late teens, and they may need to be removed due to crowding, pain or infection.

Adults

Oral care during your adult life is as just as important as it is throughout childhood. Neglected teeth and gums can lead to cavities, infection and tooth loss. If a cavity becomes too deep, root canals may be required. Daily brushing and flossing are the most effective way to prevent these issues and keep teeth and gums healthy – it may sound repetitive, but it’s true!

Pregnancy

Women who are pregnant should schedule checkups between 4-6 months of pregnancy. If you have a sweet tooth while pregnant, or if you suffer from morning sickness, make sure to be extra diligent with oral hygiene.

Seniors

Oral health is a lifestyle, and maintaining a healthy mouth when you are older can prevent a multitude of health problems. During this stage of your life it’s essential to schedule regular dental checkups (even if you have dentures) so your dentist can look out for any problems that need to be addressed. It’s also especially important to watch for early signs of oral cancer. If you notice any open sores or changes in the tongue and cheek lining, we offer oral cancer screenings.

Provided you stick to a good oral hygiene routine throughout your lifetime, most of the dental problems we have outlined can be easily prevented. At Whistler Dental, we offer general dentistry services for the entire family. To find out more about what you can be doing for you oral health at any age, book an appointment with us.

Cavities are very common in both adults and children. In fact, tooth decay is the world’s second most prevalent disease, after the common cold. We hope that none of our patients ever have to experience the pain and inconvenience of a cavity. However, if you do get a cavity in your lifetime, it’s important to know what to expect. Cavities give many warning signs before progressing to the next stage. We’ve outlined the life cycle of a cavity, so that you can spot one developing, and prevent it from causing serious damage.

#1 The early signs of decay

Tooth decay is caused when enamel is worn down by acid in the mouth. Smoking, regularly consuming acidic drinks and sugary foods, and irregular dental check-ups all increase the likeliness of dental decay. When you don’t practice good oral hygiene, the sugars on your teeth build up, and bacteria begins to feed off them and produce acid. These bacteria, food particles and saliva combine to form plaque and dull spots on the surface of the tooth.

At this stage, so long as you practice regular cleaning and good oral hygiene, it’s fairly easy to get rid of this plaque and stop these dull spots from forming into a cavity.

#2 The damage of a tooth

The plaque starts to thin as the enamel wears away. Eventually this hole will go deep enough to break the enamel surface and expose the dentin underneath. This is when the hole officially becomes a cavity. From here, the tooth will decay more rapidly, and the cavity will get larger and deeper. Cavities at this stage usually aren’t painful. This is why regular check-ups are essential, as often you won’t know if a cavity is developing.

#3 The beginning of pain

After the tooth erodes the enamel, it starts to erode the dentin. This will bring the nerve of the tooth closer to the surface, and will make your tooth extremely sensitive. As soon as you feel discomfort you should visit your dentist. As long as the decay hasn’t gotten past all of the dentin, you can still repair the tooth with a filling.

#4 The start of infection

If food and bacteria get caught in a cavity, it can be difficult to get them out. If these food particles stay in the tooth for too long, it can lead to infection – of both the tooth and of the surrounding bone. As you can imagine, this is incredibly painful! If this happens you should visit your dentist immediately to clear up the infection. A root canal – or even tooth extraction – might have to be performed as a last resort.

#5 The final treatment

As you can see, it’s far better to get treated for a cavity early on. While small cavities can be easily dealt with, large ones require much more extensive treatment, and end up being more painful and expensive for you. The best way to prevent cavities is by sticking to a good oral hygiene routine, and by visiting your dentist regularly. If you are experiencing any pain, or if it’s about time for a checkup, book your appointment with Whistler Dental today.

It’s that time of year again! Summer has passed in the blink of an eye, and school is just around the corner. When it comes to clothing and school supplies you may be prepared, but have you considered how you’re going to keep your child’s teeth healthy throughout the year? From dental appointments, to lunchbox tips, to dental habits at home, here’s are some easy steps you can take to make sure your kids stay smiling and their mouths stay healthy.

#1 Book your dental appointment in advance

Between barbecues, bike rides, and family vacations, it’s easy to forget about back-to-school dental appointments until at least late August. However, unsurprisingly most other parents have the same idea, so book in advance to avoid the rush!

Regular dental visits are important year-round, but a back-to-school check-up is especially essential. Up to a third of children miss school days due to oral problems like cavities every year. By visiting the dentist at least twice a year, early signs of cavities can be detected, and necessary treatment can be given.

#2 Encourage dental habits at home

While you’re easing your kids back into the early morning routine, don’t forget to encourage them to continue practicing a solid dental routine at home. Depending on your child’s age, they may need a bit of supervision to make sure they are brushing correctly twice a day and flossing once a day.

Try setting a specific time to brush teeth every day. With little time to spare on most busy school mornings, many kids eat breakfast on the way to school. If this is the case, make sure they remember to brush before they head down for breakfast.

#3 Replace your child’s toothbrush

You should replace a toothbrush every three months, and even sooner if the bristles are frayed. If you find it hard to remember when you should be replacing them, have a few extra toothbrushes stored just in case, and bring a new one out every time your child gets a new report card. Next time you’re shopping for groceries or back-to-school supplies, head to the dental care aisle and let your child pick out their own brush and toothpaste. Not only will this keep them occupied in the grocery store, but it will also help to make teeth brushing fun and exciting!

#4 Pack healthy lunchboxes

It’s tempting to fill lunchboxes with easy, unhealthy snacks like chocolate bars and chips. However, sticky, sugary food clings to teeth and encourages plaque to grow and cavities to develop. An easy way to maintain a healthy smile is by swapping sugary snacks for healthy alternatives – like fruits, nuts, grains, cheese, and raw veg. If your child does want to indulge in the occasional chocolate bar (and don’t we all?), try and make sure they eat it just after a meal, as the previous food will help protect teeth against sugar.

#5 Get your child fitted for a mouth guard

Back to school means the return of gym class and organized sports. If your child participates in physical activity, they’ll need a fitted mouth guard to prevent injuries. While over the counter mouth guards work, they often do not fit well and can be uncomfortable. We fit custom mouth guards that fit teeth properly and protect the teeth, lips, cheeks and tongue from trauma.

Here at Whistler Dental, we wish you all the best for the new school year! For a custom mouthguard fitting, or for a back-to-school check-up, please book an appointment.

Invisalign is a relatively easy and discreet treatment that straightens teeth using a series of removable plastic aligners. Offering numerous benefits, it is extremely popular amongst our adult clientele who want the luxury of a virtually invisible treatment. However, more and more parents are asking: Does Invisalign work for kids?

While there are many advantages of Invisalign over traditional braces, every child is different, and the success of this treatment will vary depending on a number of factors. Here are the benefits of Invisalign for children, and how we decide if it’s the right solution for your child.

The benefits Invisalign for your child:

  • Unlike traditional metal braces, Invisalign is meant to be taken out during teeth cleaning. This means your child will not need to make any major adjustments to their regular dental routine. They can continue to keep teeth clean and healthy, and reduce the risk of cavities or gum disease.
  • Another serious benefit is that Invisalign aligners should be removed for all meals. This means your child’s diet is not restricted, and Invisalign will not interfere with everyday life.
  • Children and teens often don’t want braces due to aesthetic reasons, and can feel extremely self-conscious with braces or crooked teeth. Invisalign is almost invisible, so can remove this potential source of anxiety.
  • Finally, Invisalign is often more comfortable and less painful for kids to wear, as there is no risk of broken brace brackets.

How do we decide if Invisalign is the right treatment for your child?

While there is no exact criteria that we use, there are a few universal things that we always consider to see if your child is a good candidate for Invisalign. These include…

Age

There is no specific age that determines when a child is right for Invisalign. However, older children and teens are usually more viable candidates. Alignments must be worn 22 hours of the day, so your child needs to be mature enough to keep their trays in their mouth for the right amount of time, and not leave them on their nightstand or at the bottom of their bag.

Each Invisalign aligner tray has tiny blue compliance indicators on them that begin to fade the more your child wears them. This means that you and your dentist can easily check that your child wears their aligners frequently enough.

Teeth positioning

We recommend Invisalign for kids who have lost all of their baby teeth and have a full set of permanent teeth. We do not advise it for children whose mouths are still growing and developing, or for any child who has significant tooth decay or damage.

Though the second and third molars (otherwise known as wisdom teeth) do not need to have erupted, we check to make sure that all of your child’s permanent incisors and first molars have erupted through the gum. Usually, we will X-Ray the patient’s mouth to assess the position of the teeth and check how much space is needed for remaining teeth to come through.

We always make sure that we choose the best and most appropriate dental treatment for your child. If you are considering Invisalign as a parent, Whistler Dental would be happy to discuss our recommendations and help you to decide if the treatment is right for your child.  You can book an appointment, or if you have any further questions regarding Invisalign, please get in contact! You can find all of our contact details here.

The season of outdoor adventures, lakeside barbecues, and relaxing vacations is well and truly underway. However, while we’re enjoying our adrenaline-inducing sports and deliciously sweet treats, a variety of dental emergencies can occur. We all know how important it is to keep our mouths and teeth healthy in the sun, but there are some accidents and dental emergencies that simply can’t be prevented. Here are some of the most common summer dental injuries, and how you can treat them.

A chipped or broken tooth

A large majority of summer injuries occur in the pool. Chipped teeth are fairly common for both adults and children, and it often doesn’t take much to sustain one: A fall on the slippery pool deck, a dive into shallow waters, or a bit of bad luck can be all it takes.

If you have chipped a tooth, it’s important to rinse your mouth with warm water, and stop the bleeding by lightly pressing gauze against the wound. To reduce the pain and swelling, place an ice pack on the area where your tooth is chipped, and take an over-the-counter pain reliever. The chip can often be successfully reattached, so make sure to save and rinse any pieces, and take them to your dentist with you immediately. However, if you can’t find the broken piece- don’t worry, as there are many other treatments available.

A knocked-out tooth

While there’s nothing quite like biking down Whistler or Blackcomb Mountain at extreme speed, it’s not uncommon to have a crash or fall. We offer custom-fit mouth guards to protect your teeth, and prevent broken or knocked out teeth from occurring in this scenario.

If you do knock out a tooth, it’s important to immediately pick it up – but do not touch the root surface. Rinse it under warm water and, if possible, place it in a glass of milk, saline or cool water, before heading to your dentist straightaway. Our ultimate goal is to get the tooth back in the socket as soon as possible, as the quicker it is replaced, the better the chances of saving the tooth.

A lost crown or filling

Fillings and crowns can fall out when you eat hard, sticky sweets, or they can just become lose in the tooth. If you swallow a crown, don’t panic! It should pass without problem.

A lost filling or crown is rarely an emergency, but it can be painful because the exposed tooth is extra sensitive. You should schedule an appointment with your dentist promptly, to avoid further damaging the exposed tooth, and to prevent the dentin underneath from changing shape. In the meantime, place dental cement directly on the tooth’s surface, to protect and seal the area.

Toothache

While we all like to indulge on our summer vacation, it’s important not to take a vacation from cleaning our teeth – especially if we’re treating ourselves to ice cream and fizzy drinks.

If your oral hygiene routine starts to slip, you may begin to feel a sharp or constant tooth pain, or get some swelling around a tooth. To ease the pain, first rinse the mouth with warm water, and use floss to remove lodged food. It’s important to never put aspirin or other painkillers against the gums near the aching tooth, as this may burn the surrounding tissue.

If your toothache is severe, or persists for over 2 days, visit your dentist immediately to make sure it isn’t something more serious.

By being sensible in the sun, sticking to your brushing and flossing routine – and not attempting any crazy dangerous stunts or backflips – you can avoid many of these emergencies. Dental injuries require immediate attention, and you can find Whistler Dental on Main St., across from the Whistler Public Library.

For more information on other dental injuries, see our emergency dental care advice. You can also contact us here to receive immediate advice from one of our dentists or specialists.

Refreshing fizzy drinks, delicious velvety ice cream, and a quick stop in the Great Glass Elevator Candy shop – in Whistler, summer is the season to indulge. But that sharp pain you feel as you take a bite of your favourite summer snack is enough to stop the fun in its tracks.

Summer is too short to let sensitive teeth rule your life, and we believe you should still be able to treat yourself every once in a while. Unless it’s severe and persistent, tooth sensitivity doesn’t usually require a trip to the dentist. Here are a few easy and smart changes you can make to your routine that can help relieve sensitive teeth.

What causes tooth sensitivity?

Tooth sensitivity is characterized by soreness in one or more teeth caused by hot and cold temperatures, and sweet or sour foods and drinks.

The inside of your tooth is made up of dentin, which contains microscopic tubules filled with tiny nerve endings. A hard outer layer of enamel, and a layer of cementum that extends down to the root of your tooth, protect this dentin.

Dentin hypersensitivity occurs when dentin loses its protective enamel or cementum coating, and the nerve endings are exposed to certain foods.

How can you protect your teeth?

#1 Upgrade your brush

While it’s important to practice good oral care, and brush your teeth at least twice a day, overzealous brushing on a daily basis can aggravate sensitive teeth. Try switching to a soft bristle brush, as it helps to keep your teeth’s protective layer as strong as possible because you aren’t scrubbing away the enamel protecting your teeth. Also, remember to change your brush every two to three months!

#2 Check your toothpaste

Ultimately, we recommend you avoid store-bought whitening products, and opt for another safe whitening method. Whitening strips, toothpastes and mouthwashes are abrasive on the enamel of your teeth, and can aggravate your teeth and gums.

If you’re not ready to ditch the whitening products altogether, try alternating between a whitening toothpaste and a less abrasive option, to see if it alleviates sensitivity. Oral-B’s Gun and Enamel Repair is one of many great toothpastes specially designed for sensitive teeth.

#3 Avoid fizzy drinks

In Whistler we are spoilt by an array of stunning lakes, and nothing quite beats relaxing by the waters edge with a cold drink in hand. However, fizzy drinks, acidic foods, and smoking all speed up the wearing away of your teeth’s enamel.

We recommend keeping consumption to a minimum, and if you really can’t survive barbecue season without some bubbles, drink through a (re-useable or recyclable!) straw, so the liquid won’t come into contact with your teeth.

#4 Don’t brush immediately after food

Acidic food and drink, such as fruit and wine, soften enamel and make your teeth weaker and more sensitive. To prevent damage, brush your teeth last thing at night and first thing in the morning, instead of immediately after consumption. You can also try drinking water or milk after eating acidic substances, as these help to balance the acidity levels in your mouth.

Here at Whistler Dental, we’d never want tooth pain or discomfort to interfere with your summer plans. If you’re still experiencing sensitivity, visit your dentist ASAP- you may have a cracked tooth or excess plaque. You can book an appointment online with us today, or get in contact here.